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Wednesday
Jul232014

2014 International WineMaker Competition


International WineMaker Competition Update...

And the results are in. We are so proud to be the recipients of 5 more Medals at this year's competition,

featuring 3,111 wines from 7 Countries, made by people like you and us. RQ2013 Cab Sauv, WS2014 Sauv Blanc, RQ2012 Red Tango, RQ2010 S. African Cab Franc/ Merlot, and RQ2012 Red Down Under. Yummy, and the judges think so too! 34 and counting!

 

Thursday
Jul032014

Cooking with Wine

If a recipe calls for dry white wine, the best all-around choice is a quality Sauvignon Blanc.
This wine will be very dry and offer a fresh light herbal tilt that will enhance nearly any dish.

If the dish has bold or spicy flavours, go for a more aromatic white wine.
Gewurztraminer, Riesling, and Viognier all have supperb fruity flavors and exotic floral aromas that counterbalance heavily spiced dishes.

If a recipe calls for dry red wine, consider the heartiness of the dish.
A long-simmered leg of lamb or beef roast calls for a correspondingly hearty wine, such as Syrah or a Zinfandel. A lighter dish might call for a less powerful red―think Pinot Noir or Chianti.

Get to know Port, Sherry, Madeira, and Marsala.
These are among the best wines good cooks can have on hand. They pack the most intense flavors and―because they're fortified with a little more alcohol than table wine―have the longest life on the pantry shelf.

  • Port has a rich sweetness and depth that's especially good in meat-based casseroles.
  • Sherry's complex roasted nutty flavors can enhance just about any soup, stew, or sautéed dish. 
  • Madeira can be mesmerizingly lush with toffee-caramel notes. Use the medium-rich style known as Bual, a touch of which will transform ordinary sautèed mushrooms. And Marsala's light caramel-like fruitiness is an integral part of Mediterranean sautès, many of which bear the wine's name in their titles.

Avoid using cooking wines.
Clearly there are far better choices than so-called "cooking Sherry!" Same with other liquids commonly billed as "cooking wine." These are made of a thin, cheap base wine to which salt and food coloring have been added. 

Never cook with a wine you wouldn't drink.
A poor quality wine with sour or bitter flavors will only contribute those flavours to the dish. Julia Child once said, "If you do not have a good wine to use, it is far better to omit it, for a poor one can spoil a simple dish and utterly debase a noble one." It's worth the money to use a quality wine.

Just don't forget to sip a little as you stir!

What Happens to the Alcohol?
After a few minutes of cooking, the alcohol in wine evaporates. That's not exactly the case. Research from the USDA shows that 85 percent of the alcohol remains after wine is added to a boiling liquid and then removed from the heat. The longer a dish is cooked, however, the less alcohol remains. If a food is baked or simmered 15 minutes, 40 percent of the alcohol will remain; after one hour, only 25 percent remains; after 2 1/2 hours, just 5 percent. But since wine does not have a large amount of alcohol to begin with (generally 12 to 14 percent), the final amount of alcohol in a dish is not a problem for most people.

Cooking wine has two meanings: There's the wine you put in a dish, and―equally as important―the wine you sip while you cook. There's no better way to spend an evening than concocting a delicious dish while sipping a good wine for inspiration.

 

Thursday
Mar062014

New Location!

We moved late 2013. We've been busy with the new place. Needed more room. We hope you decide to come and visit us in our new, snazzy looking location. Come and look at all the wine being made!

We are now located at: A2-1055 Sarnia Road, London, ON

You can find us here. 

 

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